Let's build a selling system to aviod the pitfalls of the path of least resistance...

Discussion in 'Sales Mastery' started by Kipp, Nov 22, 2013.

  1. Kipp

    Kipp Syndicated Entrepreneur

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    This concept really relates to almost every decision we make in our business world....

    Our natural desire is to move in the course of least resistance, we do this because this generally aligns with our current beliefs and therefore is our comfort zone. The struggle with this behavior is as we approach forks in the roads in our decision making process we fail to see the benefits of what at first seems to be a bumpy and dangerous route vs the other (our comfort zone) which appears to be a beautiful open smooth road.

    What we don't realize is that bumpy dangerous road many times opens up to far more successful decisions and those beautiful open roads end up dead ends (AND create self limiting beliefs).

    The challenge is how do we see beyond that fork in the road? How can we base decisions on something more reliable that just that first appearance at the fork in the road?

    The best way I have found is to have a proven system, a system that you trust above even your own perceptions, beliefs, and emotional reactions. By having a system in place when you reach those forks in the road you trust your system to make those decision for you because it has proven to guide you to your desired results.

    I have a selling system engrained in me...I lived and breathed it everyday, I practiced it, I trained others on it and I have seen it deliver amazing results. Is it a top secret super magic system? No, pretty simple actually, however when implementing it in real life situations I find very few who can actually let it guide them and far to many stray from it choosing those alluring "easy roads"

    This system can't be something you sit down and hammer out yourself, what good would that do? Then you would just have a written system of how to take the "easy road" big deal. I challenge you to open your mind up, read books, ask questions and create a system that can help you see those hidden treasures in what first appears to be a bumpy road....

    Let's say you where going to create a system for your customers service experience. This would cover A-Z from the time you arrived at a customers home to perform and job to the time you left. Your system should cover.

    1. Arrival
    2. Meet & Greet
    3. Rapport & Trust building
    4. Customer walk through - Identifying wants and needs
    5. Feature benefit of add on services
    6. Job performance
    7. Customer wrap up
    8. Pack up and exit

    Or something along those lines. Now take each of those and research outside your current perception ideas that others have used to create success. Practice and implement them. The ones that prove to be successful stay the rest discard and continue looking for others...it is CRITICAL though that you do OBJECTIVE self evaluations of your implementation of the ideas to ensure that you gave them an honest chance to work and you didn't allow your limiting beliefs to simply convince you that they can't work therefore won't work.

    Let's take each of these one by one and really brainstorm what each should look like, feel like, and act like. So #1 Arrival...well let's see
    • Van should be clean and lettered/wrapped
    • Van shouldn't leak oil
    • We should be 5-10 minutes early
    • We should park in the road first
    • We should make sure the customer can see our beautiful van when they open they door
    • Get out of the van immediately. Every minute you sit in the van the customer is building up more anxiety.
    • Turn your radio off. Even talk radio can be heard surprisingly far from your van.
    • Make sure your uniform is in place(your appearance) and you smell decent.
    • Call prior to arrival
    • Time to get mentally focused
    • Make sure you look good
    • You should already have your plastic tabs in your back pocket, shoe covers in front pocket, your card, magnet, brochure, and free spotter sitting on your clipboard so you can be ready to rock and roll as soon as you pull up.
    • Take those sunglasses off your head, make sure you have your black light on your hip and carpet knife or duck billed scissors as well. And a pocket full of business cards.
    #2 Meet & Greet
    • Hand your card out to the customer instead of the open hand for a shake.
    • DO NOT chew gum when you are talking to your customer and always look them in the eye when you are conversing
    What else?
     
  2. Bill Yeadon

    Bill Yeadon FatCat Entrepreneur

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    Very nice. And thanks for not calling it a secret. Every time I see "secrets" I know to hold onto my wallet. Thanks for sharing.

    By the way I would add get out of the van immediately. Every minute you sit in the van the customer is building up more anxiety.
     
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  3. TheEyeball

    TheEyeball Friend of the Ladies

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    Ross Trittipo
    Turn your radio off. Even talk radio can be heard surprisingly far from your van. I've even tried turning mine down, but even at level 8 or 10 (pretty low in my 2012 Chevy) I can still here Colin Cowherd ranting about Nick Saban when I'm standing on the customer's porch. Better safe than sorry. Just turn it off.
     
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  4. fencerider

    fencerider Entrepreneur

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    I love Colin Cowherd!
     
  5. asi

    asi FatCat Member

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    Make sure your uniform is in place(your appearance) and you smell decent.
     
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  6. Bill Yeadon

    Bill Yeadon FatCat Entrepreneur

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    I think much of this can be summed up by the term thin slicing popularized by Malcolm Gladwell in Blink.

    Thin slice methodology is an important term to understand when it comes to being an effective communicator, especially with nonverbal cues and elements. Firstly, let me be clear that the term 'thin slice' has nothing to do with the width of a slice of pizza!

    What thin slice methodology does refer to is observing a small selection of an interaction, usually less than 5 minutes, and being able to accurately draw to conclusions in the emotions and attitudes of the people interacting. These observations are, often surprisingly to many people, very accurate compared to self-ratings and ratings based on the entire interaction. This holds true even when based on observing only a few seconds of the interaction with the first moments of the interaction being the most relevant (Ambady et al, 2000). 5 second clips have been reported to be just as accurate as 5 minutes clips (Ambady & Rosenthal, 1993). Taken from Psychology Today.


    Your customer will decide within moments whether or not this is going to be a pleasant experience.
     
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  7. Torrey W

    Torrey W Syndicated Entrepreneur

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    Torrey Whitaker
    I've always loved the tip, handing your card out to the customer instead of the open hand for a shake.
    If they want to they will shuffle the card and shake, but if they would rather not, they can use that card as their little way out of touching a stranger.
     
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  8. 212.0

    212.0 Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    Ty Cranmore
    This is an awesome topic! Lots of things to think about
     
  9. extremecleantn

    extremecleantn FatCat Member

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    I hate Nick Saban !

    But you're right. I have a buddy who works for a huge multi truck plumbing company in Nashville and turning radio off when you turn on to customers street is part of their training.
     
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  10. Carpet-Rx of Louisville

    Carpet-Rx of Louisville Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    I call when Im on my way. Do you think that builds anxiety even longer or does it just happen when we show up? I think they appriciate the phone call first.
     
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  11. Craig Harrison

    Craig Harrison FatCat Member

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    Great thread! I see many contractors not realize the importance of professionalism and common sense in what they do. People buy because they like, trust and respect you. Using the above advice as guidance builds your credibility very fast.

    My pet peeve (to add to the list) is to please, NOT chew gum when you are talking to your customer and always look them in the eye when you are conversing.
     
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  12. Kipp

    Kipp Syndicated Entrepreneur

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    Once we get through each area I'll help facilitate some key sales strategies and we come compile a nice system that we can then reference and provide feedback as a group on how it impacts our business...
     
  13. Bill Yeadon

    Bill Yeadon FatCat Entrepreneur

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    I think a call is always appreciated. Let them know during the iinitial scheduling that you will call on yur way. Just in case they have a reason for not calling.
     
  14. Carpet-Rx of Louisville

    Carpet-Rx of Louisville Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    Ok then... #1 Arrival...in addition to what you've already listed, here's another good one. I've had helpers who like to text and call their girlfriend as soon as the get back in the van. I say cut that crap out about 5 min before arriving to customers house. Time to get mentally focused, take a shot of 5 hr energy, make sure you look good, smell good, and you should already have your plastic tabs in your back pocket, shoe covers in front pocket, your card, magnet, brochure, and free spotter sitting on your clipboard so you can be ready to rock and roll as soon as you pull up.
    Oh and take those sunglasses off your head, make sure you have your black light on your hip and carpet knife or duck billed scissors as well. And a pocket full of business cards.
     
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  15. Kipp

    Kipp Syndicated Entrepreneur

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    Okay I updated the original post with all the feedback for #1 Arrival and we got a little head start on #2 meet and greet. What are some other keys to a professional meet and greet?

    PS Feel free to add things to prior steps we have discussed if you think of them (just don't skip ahead...it will be to confusing)
     
  16. Steve Toburen

    Steve Toburen FatCat Entrepreneur

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    Wear a photo ID badge.

    Park on the street where they can see your van when they open the door.

    Stand back three feet after you ring the bell. (don't crowd into their personal space when they open the door)

    Steve

    PS Re: Arrival a huge Moment of Truth is to (if possible) knock on the door to the second of your scheduled time. HERE is how to do it. BTW, a good idea for a thread.
     
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  17. TheEyeball

    TheEyeball Friend of the Ladies

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    Ross Trittipo
    #2

    --no sunglasses
    --genuine smile
    --iron your freaking clothes
    --clean shoes
    --show personal interest without being creepy
    --pretend to like their dog even though it's dry humping your leg and putting it's wet disgusting nose all over your hand
    --never enter the home until they invite you--trust me, an awkward silence while waiting for them to ask you in is much better than bullying your way in.
    --pretend your shoes are covered in raw sewage
    --if you wanna be a rockstar like me roll your custom mat out on the porch, slip your clean shoes into your clean Tidy Trax while standing on your mat, then knock on the door.
    --I don't ever ring the bell. Once in a while someone will say something about it and I always say "Well I just never know if there are little ones inside taking a nap this time of day". Instantly makes you seem like you care.
    --eye contact and lots of it
     
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  18. Six Figure Solo Cleaner

    Six Figure Solo Cleaner Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    I think it all starts with the state of mind. Finding partners/employees w the proper self respect, self confidence and self esteem is where I start.
    Instilling the protocol/procedures is simple after that
     
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  19. Kipp

    Kipp Syndicated Entrepreneur

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    I agree some things should be common sense and the right people would naturally behave in ways that align with them.

    Still good to have a written procedure and once we get into the "meat' of the system there will be a lot more core competencies and strategies that will need to be trained unless you find people who have had that type of training in past careers. Even then it will probably take some modifications to conform to your companies vision.
     
  20. Royal Man

    Royal Man Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    You forgot the most important part. Trust should be gained before the client even calls you or before they even see your website. Then the rest becomes cake as trust is reinforced every step along the way.

    Some say that love can be a first sight.

    It's up to your marketing to create infatuation with your company at its first glance.

    Like I said before if you can do that then the rest is cake and becomes secondary
     
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