A question for you water damage guys

Discussion in 'Water Damage/Fire Restoration' started by mahlonzehr, Feb 13, 2014.

  1. mahlonzehr

    mahlonzehr FatCat Player

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2013
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    58
    Name:
    Mahlon Zehr
    Does a diesel or kerosene space heater add moisture to the air?

    My brother is building a house this winter and he's trying to get the studs and everything dried out before they insulate and do interior work. His insulation guy told him that he's better off just using dehumidifiers and fans and skipping the heat altogether because kerosene and diesel space heaters just add humidity to the atmosphere and actually slow down the drying process.

    Is this true? I had never heard of this before, and I told him it's baloney, but I thought maybe I'd better check and make sure. He also told him that water damage guys don't use any heat at all, which I know is not true, but I didn't know if there was something funny about the diesel or kerosene space heaters?

    Thanks!
     
    Tobias Arlebo likes this.
  2. Spotman123

    Spotman123 FatCat Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2013
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    33
    As far as a space heater adding moisture, I do not know. But what I do know is in structural drying you need 3 things: 1)heat, 2)air movement and 3)dehumidification...
     
    Jeffrey Tobian and mahlonzehr like this.
  3. 0331grunt

    0331grunt FatCat Player

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2013
    Messages:
    177
    Likes Received:
    79
    Diesel and Kersone heaters do produce humidity and the insulation guy is right. However, if done correctly, I think it can work. Some of the forced air heaters in the drying industry rely on these fuels, but in conjunction with dehu's prevent the negative affects of the fuel being burned. At least that is the way I understand it.
     
    mahlonzehr likes this.
  4. PCS_FL

    PCS_FL FatCat Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2013
    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    64
    lol that's how my inlaws house almost burned down. Drywall guys wanted to dry the finish work up so they could come in and sand then paint quicker. Set up a few heaters, got a call in the early am from some pissed off homeowners. That shortcut cost them a lot. Instead of refinished ceilings they got their home gutted to the blocks and rafters, worked out for my inlaws, not so much for the contractors. I'd dehumidify or rent some tex boxes, but wouldn't play with the kerosene in anything but a wide open space.
     
    Tobias Arlebo likes this.
  5. aspenedelen

    aspenedelen FatCat Player

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2013
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    99
    Electric heat is the only way to go. Using Kero and Diesel burners along with Nat Gas will put moisture into the air. At one point I used to know the exact amount of moisture that is expelled with the source is burned but I have since lost that information. I will try to find those figures though and if I can I will post them.
     
    Tobias Arlebo likes this.
  6. Scott Warrington

    Scott Warrington FatCat Entrepreneur

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2013
    Messages:
    424
    Likes Received:
    278
    Diesel, Kerosene or any HYDROCARBON provide the hydrogen part of H2O. When burned, this mixes with oxygen from the atmosphere. For each gallon of kerosene burned, between 8 and 9 gallons of water vapor are added to the air. Yes, the heaters do slow down drying.

    There are two main ways to add heat without this problem that slows down drying. #1 Use electric heat. (E-TES units for example) #2 Use indirect fired heaters. That means the fuel is burned in one place with all the exhaust going outside but the heat is ducted or directed in some manner to the area being dried. (Dri-Eaz Dragon for example).
     
    Jeffrey Tobian and Tobias Arlebo like this.
  7. Aim Bond Cleaning

    Aim Bond Cleaning FatCat Noob

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Name:
    Mitchelle Donaldson
    hii,
    i read your blog after that i have a suggustion for you i hope its benefical for you
    THIS IS A SMALL TIP: WHEN YOU ARE WALKING THROUGH THE ROOM AND GET A SHOCK WHEN YOU TOUCH A LIGHT SWITCH AND USE KEROSENE HEATERS. ALL YOU NEED TO DO IS FIND AN OLD PAN THAT CAN HANDLE MINERALS AND ADD WATER TO IT. PLACE THE POT WITH THE WATER ON THE TOP OF YOUR HEATER AND IT WILL EVAPORATE THE WATER AND ADD THE MOISTURE TO THE AIR. TO REMOVE THE MINERALS FROM THE PAN AFTER THE WATER EVAPORATES, USE SOME STRAIGHT VINEGAR; SWISH THE VINEGAR IN THE POT, LET SIT AND THEN USE THE SCRATCHY PAD IN THE VINEGAR MIX TO GET OUT THE STUFF LEFT OVER FROM THE WATER. YOU CAN USE DISTILLED WATER TO AVOID THE CLEANUP, BUT THE VINEGAR WORKS WELL, OR USE A CAMPING PAN. MY PERFECTION HEATERS EVAPROATE ABOUT 1 QUART OF WATER IN 3 HOURS AND YOU WON'T GET SHOCKED (OR SHOCK THE CATS AND DOGS) AFTER YOU GET SOME HUMIDITY IN THE AIR.

    HaPPY ! To ! Help ! You
     
  8. TheEyeball

    TheEyeball Friend of the Ladies

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2013
    Messages:
    2,209
    Likes Received:
    1,206
    Name:
    Ross Trittipo
    Hey! You're weird! What's your story man? Tell us more about yourself.
     
  9. Jeffrey Tobian

    Jeffrey Tobian FatCat Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    78
    Name:
    Jeffrey B. Tobian
    Think of a hair blow drier Heat and air movement and when the air fills up with moister you need to get rid of that. If you do not have a dehumidifier , you can duck a fan to the window with lay flat ducting. Like Scott said a TES unit is the way to go . But once I had a customer that 3 electric heaters we put then in one room with 6 fans and a dehumidifier . (the walls were wet a foot high and all the carpet and pad were wet) I had all the carpet and pad and most of the walls dry in one day and by the 2nd day everything was dry. But a TES unit it much safer to use and that is what you should use in someone home. We got the room up to 120 degrees You just need to get the heat at the source, like when you are drying your hair when you just got out of the shower , the air is full of moister 100 percent RH but it stills dries your hair but try not to get other things wet from too much moister in the air , secondary damage
     
    Scott Warrington likes this.
Loading...

Share This Page