A Question for the Pet Odor Specialists

Discussion in 'Sales Mastery' started by Carpet-Rx of Louisville, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. Carpet-Rx of Louisville

    Carpet-Rx of Louisville Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    Inspection Process:
    What are your procedures when it comes to inspecting the home and pinpointing and marking where the urine stains are?
    Do you charge extra for the inspection considering you have made a sizeable investment on UV Lights, Moisture Meters, Water Claws, and education?
    How much do you charge for the inspection alone?
    Or do you just walk through and ask the customer if the dog peed and where it is?

    Cleaning Process:
    After the inspection and based on the severity of the pet damage, do you immediately start with your entire cleaning process or proceed to do the enzyme injections down into the padding and let them do their work until you return the next day to finish the process?

    Sorry for ALL the questions, but I want to get my system down, now that I have all the tools it takes to do the job right. When I explain the inspection process, the first question is "do you charge extra for that?"

    I know there will be different answers to this, but I really think I should charge a fair price for my education, experience, time, and expensive equipment. Just not sure how much to charge...ballpark.
     
  2. freemind

    freemind Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    I think you should charge $199.99 for the inspection.
     
  3. Decker01

    Decker01 Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    Actually... If you price your inspection at $199 and provide a detailed report of the contamination, you may have a product. Now take that and sell it via Groupon, Living Social, Angie's List Big Deal or some other avenue...

    They discount it down to, say, $99, of which you will likely see half. I'll take $50 to do an estimate on a Urine job! You could even offer to put the $99 towards the cleaning and remediation effort if they decide to treat the issue!
     
  4. Decker01

    Decker01 Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    I will post more on this later. UV light, Moisture sensor, and possibly poker chips to mark it. I've also made rings with a bucket in the carpet over the spots.

    http://deckerscarpetcleaning.com/services/pet-stain-odor-treatment/
     
  5. Martin Sanchez

    Martin Sanchez Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    How would you perform and justify a $199 inspection. Just curious
     
  6. Scott Warrington

    Scott Warrington FatCat Entrepreneur

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    We always did the inspection at no charge and made money on the cleaning / deodorization service. But I could see an inspection as a Groupon special.

    We had 3 levels of service for urine. In many cases folks still had pets in the home and knew the area would be recontaminated. They did not want to do the whole 9 yards. If we were going to use enzymes, we did try to apply / inject them and allow them a day or more to work. Had to be careful about kids or pets getting into the enzymes.
     
  7. Carpet-Rx of Louisville

    Carpet-Rx of Louisville Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    Hmmmmmmm. My original thought was to charge about $65 for the inspection which would include pinpointing each stain, marking it with a lil purple sticker, injecting some biomodifier xtreme down into the padding, and if they decide to have the rest of the work done, the $65 is deducted from the total.
    I would come back the next day and do the rest of the pet treatment and extraction.

    Some people might not call for the rest of the urine removal process if I were to treat the top of the carpet on the inspection visit and the smell is gone...so I didnt include that part. Am I short changing myself or going about this in an unusual way or is this a common practice?
     
  8. Scott Warrington

    Scott Warrington FatCat Entrepreneur

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    I don't know of others doing it that way. But that does not mean it is the wrong way or a bad way, just different. Maybe you are on to something. Worth a try for 6 months or so and see how it goes.

    With some people, you can inspect, which you have to do to protect yourself, show them urine all over the carpet and they just want a cleaning. Your method would help cover the cost of inspection time and equipment.
     
  9. freemind

    freemind Syndicated FatCat Entreprenuer

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    Actually, I was being factious. (aka using sarcasm).

    Unless you are doing something other than just pointing out and marking urine somehow, I think the process of charging for it will go over like a lead balloon. Yes, you could take it off the bill, but as Scott has told us before, you have to neutralize the urine before using enzymes. So, this is the process I have always used. I don't inject enzymes and come back later to clean the carpets.

    I applaud anyone finding a new way to generate revenue. I just think, this idea won't go over well to just charge for an inspection.
     
  10. Josh

    Josh FatCat Member

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    I usually don't charge for inspection, unless that's all the client wants.

    When I do an inspection for urine, it's with the intent to remedy the client's odor problem and get paid for it; it's a price quote. So my cost of tools for the job, from black light to water claw, is justified by the pay I get for successfully taking care of the problem.

    I use black lights, moisture detectors, I look for discoloration and smell to help pinpoint the problem areas.
    I will use poker chips, business cards, and sometimes string to mark the areas.
    Depending on how severe the odor problem is, I will inject, do a topical treatment, or saturate and sub-surface extract. I rarely replace padding and seal sub-floor. It's too hard on my bod.
     
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  11. OneBlueSummer

    OneBlueSummer FatCat Member

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    Charlie
    I think your over thinking this.
    Get it done the first time and don't waste time or money on enzymes etc.
    Break out all the inspection tools walk and talk like a pro, show them the areas tell them what your going to do to rid the problem and how much money u will save them from having to replace the carpet pad etc.
    Break the salts, oxidized and deodorize. Suck n rinse till its running clear water.
    Say how happy u are with results and tell them u are happy they are happy. Thank them for writing a review and tell them how much u appreciate their business.
    Ba De ba De dats all folks.
     
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  12. Ben

    Ben FatCat Noob

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    Ben Surdi
    When its just a routine carpet cleaning job that has a few pet spots than it is scheduled at a normal cleaning. If the person on the phone is specifically calling about pet damage in the home than I charge $199 for the inspection. I'll go out and do my inspection with all my tools, draw out the contamination map and than let them know I will send the estimate within 24 hours. They always go with my bid and I charge a lot for it so if its not broke don't fix it!
     
  13. Steve Toburen

    Steve Toburen FatCat Entrepreneur

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